Stunning pictures of 1969 first moon landing


Stunning pictures of the iconic first moon landings in color give a fascinating glimpse into a mission which changed the world.

Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. ‘Buzz’ Aldrin Jr are seen walking on the moon as they make ‘one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind’.

Other amazing shots show the American flag planted in the surface of the moon, the Apollo 11 taking off attached to a Saturn V rocket from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and President Richard Nixon waiting for the astronauts to return.

Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two humans on the moon on 20th July 1969. 

Astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin is pictured walking on the lunar surface near the leg of the lunar module, named the Eagle. He and mission commander Neil Armstrong spent 21.5 hours on the surface of the moon, and the landing was broadcast live across the world. Although Apollo 11 consisted of a three-man crew, Michael Collins did not set foot on the moon as he piloted the command module Columbia while the other two were on the surface

Astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin is pictured walking on the lunar surface near the leg of the lunar module, named the Eagle. He and mission commander Neil Armstrong spent 21.5 hours on the surface of the moon, and the landing was broadcast live across the world. Although Apollo 11 consisted of a three-man crew, Michael Collins did not set foot on the moon as he piloted the command module Columbia while the other two were on the surface

Astronaut Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin is pictured walking on the lunar surface near the leg of the lunar module, named the Eagle. He and mission commander Neil Armstrong spent 21.5 hours on the surface of the moon, and the landing was broadcast live across the world. Although Apollo 11 consisted of a three-man crew, Michael Collins did not set foot on the moon as he piloted the command module Columbia while the other two were on the surface

Candid shots show Buzz Aldrin (pictured) and Neil Armstrong relaxing inside the space vessel on their way to the moon. Aldrin was a former Air Force officer, who would be the second human to walk on the surface of the moon. When mission commander Armstrong, on the surface of the moon, said: 'Isn't it magnificent?', Aldrin responded: 'Magnificent desolation'. They were in the module for 6.5 hours before Armstrong ventured outside, and Aldrin joined his colleagues 20 minutes later

Candid shots show Buzz Aldrin (pictured) and Neil Armstrong relaxing inside the space vessel on their way to the moon. Aldrin was a former Air Force officer, who would be the second human to walk on the surface of the moon. When mission commander Armstrong, on the surface of the moon, said: 'Isn't it magnificent?', Aldrin responded: 'Magnificent desolation'. They were in the module for 6.5 hours before Armstrong ventured outside, and Aldrin joined his colleagues 20 minutes later

Candid shots show Buzz Aldrin (pictured) and Neil Armstrong relaxing inside the space vessel on their way to the moon. Aldrin was a former Air Force officer, who would be the second human to walk on the surface of the moon. When mission commander Armstrong, on the surface of the moon, said: ‘Isn’t it magnificent?’, Aldrin responded: ‘Magnificent desolation’. They were in the module for 6.5 hours before Armstrong ventured outside, and Aldrin joined his colleagues 20 minutes later

Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, is pictured inside the Lunar Module while it rested on the surface of the moon. Three years earlier he had made his first space flight as the command pilot of Gemini 8, a mission which made him  NASA's first civilian astronaut to fly in space. Armstrong, a former Air Force pilot, marked the Eagle's landing with a brisk handshake with Aldrin before preparing the vessel for a quick liftoff in the event of an emergency

Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, is pictured inside the Lunar Module while it rested on the surface of the moon. Three years earlier he had made his first space flight as the command pilot of Gemini 8, a mission which made him  NASA's first civilian astronaut to fly in space. Armstrong, a former Air Force pilot, marked the Eagle's landing with a brisk handshake with Aldrin before preparing the vessel for a quick liftoff in the event of an emergency

Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, is pictured inside the Lunar Module while it rested on the surface of the moon. Three years earlier he had made his first space flight as the command pilot of Gemini 8, a mission which made him NASA’s first civilian astronaut to fly in space. Armstrong, a former Air Force pilot, marked the Eagle’s landing with a brisk handshake with Aldrin before preparing the vessel for a quick liftoff in the event of an emergency

The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 11 space vehicle was launched from Pad A, at Launch Complex 39, at the Kennedy Space Center at  9.32am on July 16. Four days later its lunar module, named the Eagle, would land on the moon, and astronauts Neil Armstrong and 'Buzz' Aldrin would become the first humans to set foot on the surface of the moon. The spacecraft was made of three parts - a command module, which had a cabin for the three astronauts, a service module, which helped propel the command module and supplied oxygen, water and electricity, and a  lunar module

The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 11 space vehicle was launched from Pad A, at Launch Complex 39, at the Kennedy Space Center at  9.32am on July 16. Four days later its lunar module, named the Eagle, would land on the moon, and astronauts Neil Armstrong and 'Buzz' Aldrin would become the first humans to set foot on the surface of the moon. The spacecraft was made of three parts - a command module, which had a cabin for the three astronauts, a service module, which helped propel the command module and supplied oxygen, water and electricity, and a  lunar module

The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 11 space vehicle was launched from Pad A, at Launch Complex 39, at the Kennedy Space Center at 9.32am on July 16. Four days later its lunar module, named the Eagle, would land on the moon, and astronauts Neil Armstrong and ‘Buzz’ Aldrin would become the first humans to set foot on the surface of the moon. The spacecraft was made of three parts – a command module, which had a cabin for the three astronauts, a service module, which helped propel the command module and supplied oxygen, water and electricity, and a lunar module

The first successful moon landing was broadcast on live TV to a worldwide audience and effectively ended the Space Race between America and the USSR. Armstrong and Aldrin landed the lunar module Eagle in the Sea of Tranquility. They were on the surface of the moon for around 21.5 hours

The first successful moon landing was broadcast on live TV to a worldwide audience and effectively ended the Space Race between America and the USSR. Armstrong and Aldrin landed the lunar module Eagle in the Sea of Tranquility. They were on the surface of the moon for around 21.5 hours

The first successful moon landing was broadcast on live TV to a worldwide audience and effectively ended the Space Race between America and the USSR. Armstrong and Aldrin landed the lunar module Eagle in the Sea of Tranquility. They were on the surface of the moon for around 21.5 hours

The Eagle has landed: The mission's lunar module, named the Eagle, is pictured on the surface of the moon on the historic day when US astronauts became the first to set foot on the moon in July 1969. The it was named Eagle after the national bird of the United States, the bald eagle

The Eagle has landed: The mission's lunar module, named the Eagle, is pictured on the surface of the moon on the historic day when US astronauts became the first to set foot on the moon in July 1969. The it was named Eagle after the national bird of the United States, the bald eagle

The Eagle has landed: The mission’s lunar module, named the Eagle, is pictured on the surface of the moon on the historic day when US astronauts became the first to set foot on the moon in July 1969. The it was named Eagle after the national bird of the United States, the bald eagle

Astronaut Edwin E. 'Buzz' Aldrin Jr is shown on the surface of the moon after the deployment of Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP). While on the surface, President Richard Nixon spoke to the duo through a telephone-radio transmission, in a conversation which Nixon described as 'the most historic phone call ever made from the White House'

Astronaut Edwin E. 'Buzz' Aldrin Jr is shown on the surface of the moon after the deployment of Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP). While on the surface, President Richard Nixon spoke to the duo through a telephone-radio transmission, in a conversation which Nixon described as 'the most historic phone call ever made from the White House'

Astronaut Edwin E. ‘Buzz’ Aldrin Jr is shown on the surface of the moon after the deployment of Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP). While on the surface, President Richard Nixon spoke to the duo through a telephone-radio transmission, in a conversation which Nixon described as ‘the most historic phone call ever made from the White House’

One of the images shows what could be the first human footprint ever made on the moon, with Armstrong's foot hovering over the imprint. Three new minerals were discovered in the rock samples collected by the astronauts - armalcolite, tranquillityite, and pyroxferroite. In honor of their achievement, Armalcolite was named after Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins

One of the images shows what could be the first human footprint ever made on the moon, with Armstrong's foot hovering over the imprint. Three new minerals were discovered in the rock samples collected by the astronauts - armalcolite, tranquillityite, and pyroxferroite. In honor of their achievement, Armalcolite was named after Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins

One of the images shows what could be the first human footprint ever made on the moon, with Armstrong’s foot hovering over the imprint. Three new minerals were discovered in the rock samples collected by the astronauts – armalcolite, tranquillityite, and pyroxferroite. In honor of their achievement, Armalcolite was named after Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins

The mission fulfilled a national goal set out by President John F. Kennedy in 1961 where he promised a man would land on the moon and returning safely to Earth before the decade was over. 

The mission fulfilled a national goal set out by President John F. Kennedy in 1961 where he promised a man would land on the moon and returning safely to Earth before the decade was over. 

The mission fulfilled a national goal set out by President John F. Kennedy in 1961 where he promised a man would land on the moon and returning safely to Earth before the decade was over. 

Then-US President Richard Nixon is seen on the deck of the USS Hornet awaiting the arrival of the Apollo 11 crew. He spoke to the astronauts while they were on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969

Then-US President Richard Nixon is seen on the deck of the USS Hornet awaiting the arrival of the Apollo 11 crew. He spoke to the astronauts while they were on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969

Then-US President Richard Nixon is seen on the deck of the USS Hornet awaiting the arrival of the Apollo 11 crew. He spoke to the astronauts while they were on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969

The first successful moon landing was broadcast on live TV to a worldwide audience and effectively ended the Space Race between America and the USSR

The first successful moon landing was broadcast on live TV to a worldwide audience and effectively ended the Space Race between America and the USSR

The first successful moon landing was broadcast on live TV to a worldwide audience and effectively ended the Space Race between America and the USSR

The crew are pictured waiting to be picked up after landing in North Pacific Ocean, around 812 nautical miles south of Hawaii

The crew are pictured waiting to be picked up after landing in North Pacific Ocean, around 812 nautical miles south of Hawaii

The crew are pictured waiting to be picked up after landing in North Pacific Ocean, around 812 nautical miles south of Hawaii

'Buzz' Aldrin is pictured climbing down from the lunar module onto the surface of the moon. The picture was taken by Armstrong, who had already descended

'Buzz' Aldrin is pictured climbing down from the lunar module onto the surface of the moon. The picture was taken by Armstrong, who had already descended

‘Buzz’ Aldrin is pictured climbing down from the lunar module onto the surface of the moon. The picture was taken by Armstrong, who had already descended

Dressed in his space suit, 'Buzz' Aldrin is seen on the surface of the moon, surrounded by footprints left by himself and mission commander Neil Armstrong

Dressed in his space suit, 'Buzz' Aldrin is seen on the surface of the moon, surrounded by footprints left by himself and mission commander Neil Armstrong

Dressed in his space suit, ‘Buzz’ Aldrin is seen on the surface of the moon, surrounded by footprints left by himself and mission commander Neil Armstrong

The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969

The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969

The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969

The surface of the moon is shown in the stunning color photographs taken during the historic first moon landing back in July 1969

The surface of the moon is shown in the stunning color photographs taken during the historic first moon landing back in July 1969

The surface of the moon is shown in the stunning color photographs taken during the historic first moon landing back in July 1969

Mission commander Neil Armstrong (left), command module pilot  Michael Collins (center) and lunar module pilot 'Buzz' Aldrin took part in the mission which saw mankind land on the moon for the first time

Mission commander Neil Armstrong (left), command module pilot  Michael Collins (center) and lunar module pilot 'Buzz' Aldrin took part in the mission which saw mankind land on the moon for the first time

Mission commander Neil Armstrong (left), command module pilot Michael Collins (center) and lunar module pilot ‘Buzz’ Aldrin took part in the mission which saw mankind land on the moon for the first time

 



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