Spinning cross optical illusion question background colour


It is a questions that has baffled the internet – is the background of an animated image black or is it white?

An optical illusion has surfaced that shows a cluster of spinning crosses, leaving many to question whether the crosses are black and the background is white or vice versa.

Although there may never be a definitive answer to this mind boggling puzzle, it is believed that the image is a concept called figure-ground organization – a type of grouping that is necessary for recognizing objects.

Scroll down for videos 

An optical illusion has surfaced that shows a cluster of spinning crosses, leaving many to question whether the crosses are black and the background is white or vice versa 

FIGURE-GROUND ORGANIZATION 

The idea of illusions that are based on teh figure-ground organization is that that they present the viewer with a mental choice of two interpretations – just as you cannot decide whether the background of the rotating crosses is black or white.

Usually those viewing the optical illusion will see a single interpretation at first and only realize the second sometime after or when they are told about it by another person.

The optical illusion first appeared on Reddit with many users saying the looping picture gave them a headache – it was then picked up by the publication Digg, which said it ‘is breaking our brains’.

The animated image shows a group of crosses spinning in no particular order.

However, depending on how you look at it, the shapes are either black or white – but it seems there is no right or wrong answer.

Digg has suggested that the optical illusion is a concept called figure-ground organization, which was discovered in 1915 by Edgar Rubin – a pioneer of perceptual psychology.

Rubin is known for creating the Rubin vase, which depending on how you view the image it will either look like a white vase down the middle or two black silhouette faces looking towards each other, according to New World Encyclopedia

The idea of these types of illusions are that they present the viewer with a mental choice of two interpretations – just as you cannot decide whether the background of the rotating crosses is black or white.

Usually those viewing the optical illusion will see a single interpretation at first and only realize the second sometime after or when they are told about it by another person.

WHAT ARE OPTICAL ILLUSIONS? 

 Optical illusions arrange a series of patterns, images and colors or play with the way an object is lit in order to trick our brains into thinking something is there – when it is not. 

When light hits our retina, it takes about one-tenth of a second for our brain to translate that signal into perception, reports Discovery News. 

Evolutionary neurobiologist Mark Changizi says this neural delay makes our brains generate images of what it thinks the world will look like in one-tenth of a second.

Psychologists have said that the human brain is capable of seeing the two images almost simultaneously, but that one will dominate depending on your experiences and your thoughts. 

‘When two fields have a common border, and one is seen as figure and the other as ground, the immediate perceptual experience is characterized by a shaping effect which emerges from the common border of the fields and which operates only on one field or operates more strongly on one than on the other,’ Rubin explained in his working regarding the optical illusions that use figure-ground organization.

Another well-known mind bender is the ¿rabbit-duck (pictured), which again, depending on how you look at it, the image creates a different animal. However, this image was created long before Rubin explained the concept behind the illusion - it was published in 1892

Another well-known mind bender is the ¿rabbit-duck (pictured), which again, depending on how you look at it, the image creates a different animal. However, this image was created long before Rubin explained the concept behind the illusion - it was published in 1892

Another well-known mind bender is the ‘rabbit-duck (pictured), which again, depending on how you look at it, the image creates a different animal. However, this image was created long before Rubin explained the concept behind the illusion – it was published in 1892

Another well-known mind bender is the ‘rabbit-duck, which again, depending on how you look at it, the image creates a different animal.

However, this image was created long before Rubin explained the concept behind the illusion.

The rabbit-duck illusion was an unattributed drawing in the 1892 issue of a German humor magazine and read ‘which animals are most like each other?’ 

 



Source link

Be the first to comment on "Spinning cross optical illusion question background colour"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*