‘Mad scientist’ designs giant mousetrap to catch raccoons 


While most people would call pest control to take care of a rouge raccoon, one ‘mad scientist’ has decided to take matters into his own hands by constructing a giant mouse trap.

The YouTuber, who goes by the name of ‘TheBackyardScientist’, spent three weeks and $360 (€370) building the massive contraption out of plywood and coils from a car suspension system.

Although he did not use the trap on a raccoon, the YouTuber showed off its abilities to obliterate other objects, such as a watermelon and 10 soda cans, as the bar was capable of traveling 42 miles per hour (67 km/h) on impact.

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A YouTuber, who goes by the name of ‘TheBackyardScientist’, spent three weeks and $360 (€370) building the massive contraption out of plywood and coils from a car suspension system that he said would be used to catch a pesky raccoon

A YouTuber, who goes by the name of ‘TheBackyardScientist’, spent three weeks and $360 (€370) building the massive contraption out of plywood and coils from a car suspension system that he said would be used to catch a pesky raccoon

A YouTuber, who goes by the name of ‘TheBackyardScientist’, spent three weeks and $360 (€370) building the massive contraption out of plywood and coils from a car suspension system that he said would be used to catch a pesky raccoon

TheBacyyardScientist designed the giant mouse trap using 2x4s, the base was constructed with three-quarters of an inch of plywood and the springs were taken from an old car suspension system.

‘Now instead of the traditional way to set a mousetrap, where you have to pull the steel bar back, that would have been way too difficult with these huge springs,’ the YouTuber said during the video.

‘When these springs are fully tightened, you really have to fight that bar back.’

‘Instead of having to fight the bar by hand, I chose to install a winch to tighten the spring.’

HOW FAST IS IT? 

TheBackyardScientist designed the giant mouse trap using 2x4s, the base was constructed with three-quarters of an inch of plywood and the springs were taken from an old car suspension system.

To test out the DIY contraption, he chose a watermelon as the first target.

The bar travels 42 miles per hour on impact, giving it the momentum to smash objects into hundreds of pieces

The bar travels 42 miles per hour on impact, giving it the momentum to smash objects into hundreds of pieces

The bar travels 42 miles per hour on impact, giving it the momentum to smash objects into hundreds of pieces

‘If the bar is 1 meter long that means it has a 3.14 journey on its way to the watermelon,’ the giant mouse trap’s creator explained.

‘And counting 10 frames for the second half of its journey, we can figure out that it was moving at about 42 miles an hour on impact.’

Instead of fighting to tighten the large coils in place, TheBackyardScientist installed a winch to tighten the spring.

All he had to do was bring the bar down, lock it and let the winch pull in the rope that tightens the spring. 

‘All you have to do is bring down the bar, lock it into place and then use the winch to pull in some of the rope which tightens the spring.’

‘Then all I got to do is pull the pin and we should be in business.’

To test out the massive DIY machine, TheBackYardScientist started with a large watermelon as the target.

Instead of fighting to tighten the large coils in place, TheBackyardScientist installed a winch (pictured) to tighten the spring. All he had to do was bring the bar down, lock it and let the winch pull in the rope that tightens the spring

Instead of fighting to tighten the large coils in place, TheBackyardScientist installed a winch (pictured) to tighten the spring. All he had to do was bring the bar down, lock it and let the winch pull in the rope that tightens the spring

Instead of fighting to tighten the large coils in place, TheBackyardScientist installed a winch (pictured) to tighten the spring. All he had to do was bring the bar down, lock it and let the winch pull in the rope that tightens the spring

Once the bar was secure and the springs were tightened, the YouTuber just had to pull the string and the bar would fly to the other side

Once the bar was secure and the springs were tightened, the YouTuber just had to pull the string and the bar would fly to the other side

Once the bar was secure and the springs were tightened, the YouTuber just had to pull the string and the bar would fly to the other side

He placed it on the board and pulled the string that held the large bar in place, which hit the fruit in seconds, smashing it into hundreds of pieces.

‘The bar came down pretty fast, but how fast,’ TheBackyardScientist said.

‘If the bar is 1 meter long that means it has a 3.14 journey on its way to the watermelon.

‘And counting 10 frames for the second half of its journey we can figure out that it was moving at about 42 miles an hour on impact.’

To test out the massive DIY machine, TheBackYardScientist started with a large watermelon as the target. He placed it on the board and pulled the string that held the large bar in place, which hit the fruit in seconds, smashing it into hundreds of pieces

To test out the massive DIY machine, TheBackYardScientist started with a large watermelon as the target. He placed it on the board and pulled the string that held the large bar in place, which hit the fruit in seconds, smashing it into hundreds of pieces

To test out the massive DIY machine, TheBackYardScientist started with a large watermelon as the target. He placed it on the board and pulled the string that held the large bar in place, which hit the fruit in seconds, smashing it into hundreds of pieces

However, smashing just one thing would be a waste of a good trap, so the YouTuber conducted more test.

The next used two coconuts, which were obliterated in seconds.

‘It took a lot of revisions to get this mousetrap working perfectly because every time I wound it up something would break so I would have to fix that and then I’d find the next weakest link and so on,’ said TheBackyardScientist.

However, smashing just one thing would be a waste of a good trap, so the YouTuber conducted more test. The next used two coconuts, which were obliterated in seconds

However, smashing just one thing would be a waste of a good trap, so the YouTuber conducted more test. The next used two coconuts, which were obliterated in seconds

However, smashing just one thing would be a waste of a good trap, so the YouTuber conducted more test. The next used two coconuts, which were obliterated in seconds

‘But a lot of welding later and it works great.’

However, the third try had a different outcome.

The self-proclaimed mad scientist created a model volcano out of 50 pounds (22kg) that when met the steel mouse trap bar was sliced in half.

And because TheBackyardScientists knew many viewers were curious about what the mousetrap could do to a human’s body, he used a Styrofoam mannequin head.

The bar smashed down on top of the head, leaving a massive dent and a side of the scalp eventually fell off.

Because TheBackyardScientists knew many viewers were curious about what the mousetrap could do to a human’s body, he used a Styrofoam mannequin head. The bar smashed down on top of the head, leaving a massive dent and a side of the scalp eventually fell off

Because TheBackyardScientists knew many viewers were curious about what the mousetrap could do to a human’s body, he used a Styrofoam mannequin head. The bar smashed down on top of the head, leaving a massive dent and a side of the scalp eventually fell off

Because TheBackyardScientists knew many viewers were curious about what the mousetrap could do to a human’s body, he used a Styrofoam mannequin head. The bar smashed down on top of the head, leaving a massive dent and a side of the scalp eventually fell off

And then he finished if with a grand finale of 10 coke cans that exploded once the bar collapsed on them

And then he finished if with a grand finale of 10 coke cans that exploded once the bar collapsed on them

And then he finished if with a grand finale of 10 coke cans that exploded once the bar collapsed on them

However, because this giant mousetrap was made to dispose of a pesky raccoon the mad scientist figured out a way to use it for just that – but without killing the animal.

By attaching a basket to the bar and filling it with cat food, he figured he could send it off, as if it was being shot from a catapult.

But when the strategy was tested on a watermelon, TheBackyardScientist determined it was time to go back to the drawing board.

Because the mousetrap was made to dispose of a pesky raccoon the mad scientist figured out a way to use it for just that – but without killing the animal. By attaching a basket to the bar and filling it with cat food, he figured he could send it off, as if it was being shot from a catapult

Because the mousetrap was made to dispose of a pesky raccoon the mad scientist figured out a way to use it for just that – but without killing the animal. By attaching a basket to the bar and filling it with cat food, he figured he could send it off, as if it was being shot from a catapult

Because the mousetrap was made to dispose of a pesky raccoon the mad scientist figured out a way to use it for just that – but without killing the animal. By attaching a basket to the bar and filling it with cat food, he figured he could send it off, as if it was being shot from a catapult

 



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