Robot inspector is checking bridges with 96% accuracy


There are nearly 56,000 defective bridges currently being used in the US and unsuspecting vehicles travel across them about 185 million time a day – but these structures could go at any moment.

However, a team of researchers have designed a ‘robot bridge inspector’ that is said to cut down on the costs for inspections and is able to thoroughly check for corrosion and other faults in the structure with 96 percent accuracy. 

Called Seekur Jr, the autonomous machine is equipped with a camera for visual crack detection, ground penetrating radar for concrete rebar assessment and unique sensors for concrete corrosion. 

Researchers have designed a ‘robot bridge inspector’ that is said to cut down on the costs for inspections and is able to thoroughly check for corrosion and other faults in the structure - with 96 percent accuracy

Researchers have designed a ‘robot bridge inspector’ that is said to cut down on the costs for inspections and is able to thoroughly check for corrosion and other faults in the structure - with 96 percent accuracy

Researchers have designed a ‘robot bridge inspector’ that is said to cut down on the costs for inspections and is able to thoroughly check for corrosion and other faults in the structure – with 96 percent accuracy

HOW DOES IT WORK? 

The University of Nevada designed a ‘robot bridge inspector’ to check bridges for corrosion and other faults.

Seekur  has a camera for visual crack detection, ground penetrating radar for concrete rebar assessment and unique sensors for concrete corrosion.

The ground penetrating radar sends a radar signal into the bridge deck and recording the two way travel time of the signal’s reflection off of objects, it can produce unique signatures of that object.

And the sensors scan the grounds searching for concrete corrosion. 

The robot then presents its results with colors: no corrosive – blue; low corrosive – green; moderate corrosive – orange; and high corrosive – red.

The robot inspector was designed by a team of researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno, which they said will work alongside the road while do the checks, allowing traffic to keep moving on the road.

‘To have a robot move effectively along a narrow bridge deck, a skid-steering 4-wheel-drive robot model such as Seekur Jr mobile robot (from Omron Adept Technologies, Inc.) is used,’ the researchers shared in the study.

‘To collect data along a bridge deck, the robot needs to move from one end of the bridge to the other end.’

‘Then it needs to turn around and continue its movement until the whole bridge deck is covered.’

The robot was also made to be waterproof, making it suitable for inspecting bridges.

Seekur Jr is the successor of the Seekur robot which is a holonomic, all-weather, outdoor robot platform for outdoor security, inspection and research.

‘The advantage of using this robot is that it is more versatile than its bigger version, Seekur, which had been used in other robotic systems,’ the team explained.

‘With a smaller form, the Seekur Jr. robot can manage to move in narrower environments.’

It is equipped with a camera for visual crack detection, ground penetrating radar for concrete rebar assessment and unique sensors for concrete corrosion. The robot also works along side the road as not to disrupt traffic 

It is equipped with a camera for visual crack detection, ground penetrating radar for concrete rebar assessment and unique sensors for concrete corrosion. The robot also works along side the road as not to disrupt traffic 

It is equipped with a camera for visual crack detection, ground penetrating radar for concrete rebar assessment and unique sensors for concrete corrosion. The robot also works along side the road as not to disrupt traffic 

The ground penetrating radar (GPR) sends  a radar signal into the bridge deck and recording the two way travel time of the signal’s reflection off of objects, it can produce unique signatures of that object.

And the sensors scan the grounds searching for concrete corrosion.

To test their robot inspector, researchers conducted a study on the Pleasant Valley Bridge, located on Highway 580 in Reno, Nevada.

To test their robot inspector, researchers conducted a study on the Pleasant Valley Bridge, located on Highway 580 in Reno, Nevada. The robot presented its results with colors: no corrosive – blue; low corrosive – green; moderate corrosive – orange; and high corrosive – red

To test their robot inspector, researchers conducted a study on the Pleasant Valley Bridge, located on Highway 580 in Reno, Nevada. The robot presented its results with colors: no corrosive – blue; low corrosive – green; moderate corrosive – orange; and high corrosive – red

To test their robot inspector, researchers conducted a study on the Pleasant Valley Bridge, located on Highway 580 in Reno, Nevada. The robot presented its results with colors: no corrosive – blue; low corrosive – green; moderate corrosive – orange; and high corrosive – red

The slow lane and shoulder were surveyed on both sides of this bridge on July 28-29, 2016 during the day.

The robot presented its results with colors: no corrosive – blue; low corrosive – green; moderate corrosive – orange; and high corrosive – red.

And following the analysis, the team saw that the bridge was in good condition, which was determined by the robot with 96 percent accuracy.

 



Source link

Be the first to comment on "Robot inspector is checking bridges with 96% accuracy"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*